Roar Bikes is a small run manufacturer of contemporary bicycles sold exclusively from their own website. They currently have 3 bike models (Bengal, Siamese and Sphynx) available for people to browse and purchase. 
In aiming to compete with other leading brands on the market, i.e. Schwinn, Yeti Cycles and Swifty Scootersthe primary objective is to build an e-commerce platform that lives within a native app or can be accessed via web browser. 
PRODUCT REQUIREMENTS
Homepage: Navigation (login, favorites, shopping cart), Products
Product Pages: Product Photos, Descriptions, Pricing, Color Options
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DELIVERABLES
Wireframes, User Flows, High Fidelity Prototypes, Design Assets
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USER PERSONA
Jake is a graphic designer for a large design agency in Los Angeles. He prides himself on having strange and interesting versions of what everyone else has; his shoes are handmade and his backpack is pink.
He likes his things well made and unexpected and makes it a point to purchase from local responsible craftspeople. He always brings a reusable cup to the coffee shop and doesn't own a car. He rides his bike to get around, so it's important that his mode of transportation is unique to suit his tastes, but practical to fit his lifestyle.
INSPIRATION & WIREFRAMES​​​​​​​
* I like to sketch my initial ideas before development.
It's no secret-- Jake is a hipster, but he's also an active body. This means he's almost always on the go and uses his phone for just about everything. He's extremely tech savvy and will fly through applications to find what he needs. The flipside here is, he'll grow bored or get annoyed if it takes longer than a few seconds to do so. If he's interested in checking out 3 bikes, he needs to be able to access them quickly. In this instance, it makes sense to use an app; a nav at the bottom of the screen where buttons are easily accessible is more ideal than launching a web browser with infinite scrolling and having to click through burger menus.
VISUAL DESIGN LANGUAGE
USER FLOW
FINAL SCREENS & INTERACTIONS
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